Job Chapters 1&2

Jun 28th, 2009 | By | Category: Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Job Chapters 1&2

Job is a picture of the Church, not of the world of mankind. Several reasons follow: (1) Throughout his  experiences, Job was righteous and faithful. (2) He loved God, although he did not understand why he was  having such hard experiences. (3) He got a higher reward as a result of faithfully passing his test than the world will get. The world gets restitution (that which was lost), not double that which was lost.

Job was in the land of Uz, and there Satan was allowed to test the mettle of his character. Job’s experience or trial is analogous to that which the Church experiences during the Gospel Age in one aspect or another. Some have felt that only natural wisdom is portrayed in the Book of Job, but that observation is not correct because many of the trials that Christians have are along similar lines, for they are residing in the flesh and dealing with other human beings. Hence the trials that Christians have very often take the natural form. Seeing how Job reacted helps us to know how God wishes us to react under similar circumstances.

Job 1:1 There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil.

Job 1:2 And there were born unto him seven sons and three daughters.

Job 1:3 His substance also was seven thousand sheep, and three thousand camels, and five hundred yoke of oxen, and five hundred she asses, and a very great household; so that this man was the greatest of all the men of the east.

First, Job’s possessions are listed. Not only was he highly esteemed among men, but he was very wealthy.

Job 1:4 And his sons went and feasted in their houses, every one his day; and sent and called for their three sisters to eat and to drink with them.

Job 1:5 And it was so, when the days of their feasting were gone about, that Job sent and sanctified them, and rose up early in the morning, and offered burnt offerings according to the number of them all: for Job said, It may be that my sons have sinned, and cursed God in their hearts. Thus did Job continually.

Job 1:6 Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the LORD, and Satan came also among them.

Job 1:7 And the LORD said unto Satan, Whence comest thou? Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it.

Job 1:8 And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil?

Job 1:9 Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought?

Job 1:10 Hast not thou made an hedge about him, and about his house, and about all that he hath on every side? thou hast blessed the work of his hands, and his substance is increased in the land.

Job 1:11 But put forth thine hand now, and touch all that he hath, and he will curse thee to thy face.

Job 1:12 And the LORD said unto Satan, Behold, all that he hath is in thy power; only upon himself put not forth thine hand. So Satan went forth from the presence of the LORD.

The Adversary felt that Job followed the Lord because of the material benefactions, prosperity, wisdom, etc., he received for his obedience. This particular allegory will not be treated at this time, but the final result is that Satan was allowed to test Job.

Job 1:13 And there was a day when his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother’s house:

Job 1:14 And there came a messenger unto Job, and said, The oxen were plowing, and the asses feeding beside them:

Job 1:15 And the Sabeans fell upon them, and took them away; yea, they have slain the servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.

One day while Job and his wife were at home, his sons and daughters were attending a party in the house of Job’s eldest son. Suddenly a messenger burst in the door to inform Job and his wife that a great calamity had just occurred. The oxen and asses that Job possessed in a certain part of his domain were taken by the Sabeans, and the servants who had the custody of these animals were slain. Thus Job lost his oxen and asses and the servants in one stroke.

Job 1:16 While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, The fire of God is fallen from heaven, and hath burned up the sheep, and the servants, and consumed them; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.

The first messenger had hardly finished declaring the calamity to Job when a second messenger came running to the door to report that in another part of Job’s property, a fire had burned up all of his sheep and the servants who were tending them.

Job 1:17 While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, The Chaldeans made out three bands, and fell upon the camels, and have carried them away, yea, and slain the servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.

No sooner had the second messenger finished his report when a third messenger arrived to say that the Chaldeans had come through his property and taken his camels and killed the servants taking care of them. What a variety of animals Job had possessed!—and they were all gone.

Job 1:18 While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, Thy sons and thy daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother’s house:

Job 1:19 And, behold, there came a great wind from the wilderness, and smote the four corners of the house, and it fell upon the young men, and they are dead; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.

Yet another messenger came with even more devastating news. During the festivity in the eldest son’s home, a great wind storm had arisen that collapsed the house and killed all of the young men.

Job 1:20 Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped,

Job 1:21 And said, Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return thither: the LORD gave, and the LORD hath taken away; blessed be the name of the LORD.

Job 1:22 In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.

All of these calamities had occurred one after the other. In one stroke, as it were, Job was deprived of all of his materials goods plus the fruit of his own body. Although these calamities were crushing to Job, his beautiful character shone through. He declared that when he came into the world, he was naked, and it appeared that he was to leave the world the same way. No murmurings or complaints crossed his lips. Even though he did not understand the reason for these calamities, he did not sin.

Job 2:1 Again there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the LORD, and Satan came also among them to present himself before the LORD.

Job 2:2 And the LORD said unto Satan, From whence comest thou? And Satan answered the LORD, and said, From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it.

Job 2:3 And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? and still he holdeth fast his integrity, although thou movedst me against him, to destroy him without cause.

Job 2:4 And Satan answered the LORD, and said, Skin for skin, yea, all that a man hath will he give for his life.

Job 2:5 But put forth thine hand now, and touch his bone and his flesh, and he will curse thee to thy face.

Job 2:6 And the LORD said unto Satan, Behold, he is in thine hand; but save his life.

Because Job’s faith in God held firm, Satan then allegorically approached God again and said that if he could afflict Job’s own person, his own body, Job would curse God. And so Satan was given that opportunity to test Job.

Job 2:7 So went Satan forth from the presence of the LORD, and smote Job with sore boils from the sole of his foot unto his crown.

Job 2:8 And he took him a potsherd to scrape himself withal; and he sat down among the ashes.

From the top of his head to the sole of his feet, Job was smitten with “boils.” For several reasons, these were not boils in the ordinary sense. They were a type of eruption that was not only very distressing but also very itchy and burning. We know this because Job used a broken piece of pottery to scrape his flesh to try to relieve some of his torment. However, the scraping greatly disfigured his flesh and the agony continued.

Job 2:9 Then said his wife unto him, Dost thou still retain thine integrity? curse God, and die.

Job 2:10 But he said unto her, Thou speakest as one of the foolish women speaketh. What? shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil? In all this did not Job sin with his lips.

Job’s wife said, “Why don’t you curse God and die? At least you would be relieved of your suffering.” This was a very severe test on Job’s wife as well, and she succumbed—she was unfaithful in making this suggestion.

Of course Job realized that death would end his agony and his troubled spirit. What else was there to live for? Nevertheless, in all this, Job did not sin with his lips.

Job 2:11 Now when Job’s three friends heard of all this evil that was come upon him, they came every one from his own place; Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite: for they had made an appointment together to come to mourn with him and to comfort him.

In the meantime, news of Job’s calamities had spread in the area, and three “friends” came to mourn with and comfort him. The three were Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite (Shiite today), and Zophar the Naamathite. The point of naming these individuals and their family background is to show that while the story began with an allegory about Satan talking with God, Job was, nevertheless, a real person. He actually lived in the land of Uz and these experiences literally happened to him.

Job 2:12 And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his mantle, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven.

Job 2:13 So they sat down with him upon the ground seven days and seven nights, and none spake a word unto him: for they saw that his grief was very great.

Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar sat down on the ground by Job’s side and commiserated with him for seven days—without speaking. Evidently Job did not speak either. Seven days and nights are a long time to silently commiserate with a person.

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