Living By Every Word Out Of The Mouth Of God

Nov 17th, 2009 | By | Category: The Basics (click on Article name)

Living By Every Word Out Of The Mouth Of God

“Man shall not live by bread alone; but by every word that
proceedeth out of the mouth of God.”—Matt. 4:4

bible_light2BREAD is a general name for food; for that which satisfies the cravings of hunger; for that which builds up and strengthens; for that which enables the continuance of life. It was appropriate, therefore, that the Lord should use bread as a symbol, or figure of that heavenly sustenance which God has arranged should now upbuild and strengthen his people, and eventually, by the first resurrection, impart to them life everlasting. Divine truth is represented as being such spiritual food; and our Lord himself, because in the divine plan he is the channel of the truth,—”the way, the truth, the life,”—is spoken of as being also “the bread of life” for his people. We are to eat, or partake of the life-giving qualities which he freely gives us in himself, if we would reach the goal of our hope—eternal life.

Our text is our Lord’s reply to the Tempter when he was in the wilderness fasting and hungry. The Tempter had suggested the use of the powers which Jesus had received a few days previous when, at his baptism in Jordan, he received the holy spirit, and with it the gifts and powers which subsequently enabled him not only to heal the sick, but to turn water into wine and to feed a multitude by increasing the two barley loaves and the two small fishes. The Adversary’s proposition was that the Lord should use this power for the gratification of his own appetite. He said, “Command that these stones be made bread.”

However pleased the Lord was to have these divine powers communicated through the holy spirit he had received, however glad he was, at appropriate times, to perform the miracles incidental to his ministry, he knew that the powers were not given him for any selfish use, for any self-gratification; and, therefore, he declined the suggestion and his reply is our text. In passing, we note that there is a lesson here worthy of the attention of all God’s people; that spiritual and divine things are not to be used in a mercenary or selfish manner. So far as they can discern matters, the Lord’s people are to keep separate and distinct their own personal preferences, desires and appetites, from the heavenly and spiritual things; and not use the latter for the services of the flesh, however pure and good the fleshly desires may be.

Our Lord’s words accept the suggestion that bread, food, necessary to human sustenance under present conditions; but they carry the thought further —they draw our attention to a higher life than the present one. The present life is not really life, but death: the world is under divine sentence of death; and only those who have come by faith into relationship with God have “passed from death unto life;” as our Master on another occasion said, “He that hath the Son hath life, he that hath not the Son shall not see life.” And again he said to one who was thinking of becoming his servant, his follower—”Let the dead bury their dead, follow thou me.”

From this standpoint we see that man cannot live by bread alone. He has the divine sentence against him, “dying thou shalt die”; and he can find no kind of bread, no kind of food, that will produce life in the full and complete sense of that word—that will swallow up death in life. He must look for another kind of “bread of life” than any earthly food; he must have another kind of “water of life” than any earthly drink. It is this heavenly food or supply to which our Lord refers; saying, “Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.”

But how is it possible for us to live by the words that proceed out of the mouth of God? What did Jesus mean? How can God’s words give us life?

He meant that all hopes of eternal life depend upon God—upon the divine plan and its promises. Looking into these promises we can see distinctly that the divine plan, dating from before the foundation of the world, is that all of God’s creatures, created in his likeness and abiding in faith, love and obedience, in harmony with him, shall have life everlasting. This is God’s general word upon the subject; namely, that obedience is the condition of life everlasting. This is, undoubtedly, what our Lord had in mind in using the words of our text: he may also have had the thought that he had come into the world upon a special mission, to do the Father’s will, and that his understanding from the beginning was that his perfect obedience to the divine will would insure him glory, honor, immortality with the Father, eventually; but that any disobedience would mean the forfeiture of divine favor, and would involve the sentence of disobedience; namely, death.

Our Lord’s prompt decision, therefore, was that to disobey the Father’s will, and thus to secure bread for the sustenance of his body, would be a great mistake; that food thus secured could sustain life for but a little while;—that his better plan would be to trust in the Word of God, the divine promise that those who love and serve and obey him shall ultimately come off conquerors and more, and have eternal life with God. And this, our Master’s conclusion, is full of instruction for us who are his disciples, seeking to walk in his footsteps. We are to learn the lesson that a man’s life consists not in the abundance of things which he possesseth—food and raiment— but that his life in the fullest, grandest, highest sense, is dependent upon his complete submission to the divine will—his careful attention to every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.

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