‘Game-changer’ allows ‘gays’ to marry online

Dec 21st, 2009 | By | Category: Signs of the Times (click on article name)

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‘Game-changer’ allows ‘gays’ to marry online

Same-sex unions not legal in your state? No problem!
Posted: December 15, 2009
11:26 pm Eastern

By Chelsea Schilling
© 2009 WorldNetDaily

Two law professors are offering a solution for homosexuals who want to be married and live in states where same-sex unions aren’t legal – “e-marriages.”

Professors Adam Candeub and Mae Kuykendall, who run the Legal E-Marriage Project at Michigan State University Law School, a private college affiliated with Michigan State University, argue that couples shouldn’t have to physically be in a state to be married under its laws.

Under a legal proposal they say is gaining momentum, homosexual couples need only log onto a website, apply for certificates in others state where “gay” marriage is legal, print the documents and plan wedding ceremonies at home.

They say states have created “geographic monopolies,” requiring marriages receiving the benefits of state licensing laws to be performed within state borders.

“Depending on a couple’s preferences for ‘e-ritual’ and a state’s desired level of regulatory control, couples could consume the trappings of a traditional ceremony before their friends and family, without travelling to another jurisdiction, perhaps with an officiant presiding on-line from a remote location,” states an abstract for a research paper co-authored by Candeub and Kuykendall.

“More simply, couples could have a complete marriage ceremony in the location of their choice, but would receive a license and file necessary papers with a distant state jurisdiction.”

Candeub and Kuykendall acknowledge that “e-marriages” will not be valid in every state. They argue that “marriage satisfies a unique human need for socially sanctioned commitment, which a simple contract cannot satisfy, a point ignored by those who argue for a purely private, contractual approach to marriage.”

The professors say they are ready to advise state legislators about the procedure to help “extract their state from the culture wars of same-sex marriage.”

Several ceremonial websites currently allow Internet surfers to tie the knot online. One website, Holy Weblock, charges $29.95 for an ordained pastor to walk couples through a ceremony by video. However, none of the arrangements are legally binding.

Candeub and Kuykendall argue that couples have legally married by proxy, mail and telephone, and that the military has for many years recognized such marriages as legal for purposes of spousal allowances and death benefits.

Still, same-sex marriage advocates who oppose the idea say it would deprive “gay”-friendly states – such as New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Iowa and Vermont – of millions of dollars from homosexual marriage tourism. According to a 2008 UCLA study, homosexual marriages are projected to generate $160 million in new revenue for Iowa in three years.

Professor Kuykendall said in a statement, “The state needs to fight marital fraud, harness modern technology to make marriage more accessible, and open its symbolic value to a variety of communities both online and offline.”

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