When Thou Mayest be Found

Feb 6th, 2010 | By | Category: Special Features (click on Article name)

There came a limit to His merciful dealing with natural Israel. When that point had been reached a separation took place between those who were Israelites (the wheat) and the remainder (the chaff).

When Thou Mayest be Found

Thinking of the Lord’s favor to Himself, the Prophet by inspiration sets forth a principle applicable to all of the Lord’s—to all people at all times, saying, For this [cause—because of God’s mercy], everyone that is godly may pray unto thee in a time when thou mayest be found: surely, when the great waters overflow, they shall not reach unto him. In other words, there is a time limit to divine mercies. The Lord will not always chide, neither will He keep (restrain) His anger forever. There came a limit to His merciful dealing with natural Israel. When that point had been reached a separation took place between those who were Israelites (the wheat) and the remainder (the chaff). The former were received into the Gospel dispensation, the others being scattered in the destruction of Israel’s national polity in A.D. 70.

Similarly in dealing with the Gospel Church, a reasonable period seems to be allowed to each individual to make his calling and election sure, who, if he fails to do so, may end up in the Great Company, but whose only hope of attaining this place is through fiery trials in which, if still unfaithful, the end will be destruction in the Second Death. Similarly in the end of this Gospel Age comes the testings of the nominal systems, with the Lord’s declaration that some will stumble and fall and be overwhelmed in the anarchy impending as Babylon is cast down, while the faithful will be “changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye.” Similarly during the Millennial Age, when the knowledge of the Lord shall fill the whole earth and every member of the race shall be privileged to see the “true light which lighteth every man that cometh into the world,” everyone will be obliged to make a start in righteousness by obedience to God’s laws; and those who refuse will, as the Prophet says, die the Second Death: “There shall be no more thence an infant of days, nor an old man that hath not filled his days; for the child shall die an hundred years old, and the sinner an hundred years old shall be accursed.”—Isa. 65:20.

David seems to speak prophetically for those in the end of this Gospel Age, saying, “Thou art my hiding place; thou wilt preserve me from trouble; thou wilt compass me about with songs of deliverance.” As the faithful were delivered in the great trouble that came upon the Jewish nation, so the faithful will be delivered from the great trouble impending upon Christendom. This does not necessarily imply that they will be taken away before the trouble. It is “Through much tribulation we shall enter the Kingdom.” As of old the three Hebrews who were cast into the fiery furnace were uninjured, while those who threw them in were slain by the heat, smitten to death, so in the coming trouble the Lord’s faithful will not be injured by the fiery trials through which they will pass.

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