Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): No such file or directory in /homepages/1/d92973051/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/simple-forum/library/sf-primitives.php on line 690

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): A link to the server could not be established in /homepages/1/d92973051/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/simple-forum/library/sf-primitives.php on line 690

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): No such file or directory in /homepages/1/d92973051/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/simple-forum/library/sf-primitives.php on line 690

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): A link to the server could not be established in /homepages/1/d92973051/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/simple-forum/library/sf-primitives.php on line 690

1 & 2 Samuel

1 Samuel Chapter 13: 2nd Year of Saul’s Reign, War with the Philistines, Doesn’t Wait for Samuel

Feb 12th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

As the Lord’s people, we have similar tests. We sometimes do things strictly forbidden by the Lord’s Word, but we rationalize that they are for expediency’s sake. Instead, we should wait and have faith if there is a delay.

Having waited the seven days, Saul probably felt he was justified in acting. The problem is that he did not have sufficient faith in what Samuel had said, and even more important, he, as the king of Israel, did not have faith in God, for whom Samuel was the mouthpiece. Thus a lack of faith in Jehovah led Saul to perform an act of disobedience. The circumstances seemed to justify his action, and the people would probably have supported his decision. Saul reasoned, “If I continue to wait for Samuel and do not make an offering to the Lord, even more people will desert, and my chances of victory in armed conflict will be zilch.” Thus Saul began to swerve only two years after beginning his reign. Already his true colors were showing.

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 12: Samuel’s Last Address as Judge of Israel

Feb 12th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Samuel continued his last public discourse, which was a review of Israel’s history. When Nahash, the king of the children of Ammon, came against the Israelites, the people said, “Nay; but a king shall reign over us.” Here we get an insight into one of the primary reasons the Israelites audibly expressed their desire to have a king; namely, a king was leading the host that came against them. Perhaps Samuel’s disposition and character were not that of a general, so the people wanted someone who could be out in front leading them in battle. Samuel rebuked the Israelites for desiring a king, for Jehovah was their King. Nevertheless, God acquiesced and set Saul as king over the nation.

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 11: Nahash the Ammonite, Saul’s Call to War and Made King Again

Feb 12th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

What a dreadful reply—Nahash, the Ammonite, agreed to make a covenant with the Israelites of Jabesh-gilead on the condition that he could thrust out all their right eyes and “lay it for a reproach upon all Israel”! Ammon and Moab were the two sons of Lot, so the Ammonites and the Moabites were derived from them.

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 10: Saul Anointed by Samuel, Two Signs

Feb 11th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

1 Samuel Chapter 10: Saul Anointed by Samuel, Two Signs 1 Sam. 10:1 Then Samuel took a vial of oil, and poured it upon his head, and kissed him, and said, Is it not because the LORD hath anointed thee to be captain over his inheritance? 1 Sam. 10:2 When thou art departed from me […]

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 9: Saul Becomes King

Feb 1st, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Step by step Saul and his servant were led to the very village where Samuel was staying. The suggestion came to the servant, probably by divine power, to go to Samuel, who had been a seer for many years. (A seer could forecast situations, almost like a mystic.) It was favorable that Saul felt they should compensate Samuel with a present, but he had nothing to give him. The servant offered to give his quarter of a shekel to the “man of God” as a token of their appreciation for telling them the way.

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 8: Israel Wants a King

Dec 31st, 2009 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Having a king would concentrate a lot of power in the hand of one individual, resulting in oppression. Family life would be broken up. If the people were already giving a tenth (their tithe) to the priesthood, they would also have to give a tenth to the king. Based on the condition of the human race, even if the first king was faithful, the greater number of his successors would be unfaithful. The fact that the king would have liberty to choose whoever he wanted would lead to autocratic power.

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 7: Ark is Brought to Abinadab’s House, Israel Repents

Dec 30th, 2009 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

“All the house of Israel lamented after the LORD” for 20 years. After Eli and his two sons died, conditions were in a state of flux, and the people lamented because there was not a proper priesthood. We believe Samuel was a Levite, although most Bibles do not so state. At any rate, Samuel was very different from an ordinary Levite, for he had other duties and journeyed throughout the land, judging the nation of Israel, whereas the normal practice was to abide by the Tabernacle.

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 6: Philistines Sorry, Send Ark Back with Gift, Israelites Punished for Irreverence.

Dec 30th, 2009 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Verses 2-7 are an interesting sidelight of history, for in spite of their animosity toward the Israelites, the Philistines were familiar with Jewish history and background and had a fear and respect lest they incur the wrath of the God of Israel. The Philistines followed the advice of their priests and diviners by making five gold likenesses of two of their afflictions: mice and emerods. Heathen religions thought that the gods had to be pacified with offerings, and even the Old Testament tells about trespass and guilt offerings in the Hebrew arrangement.

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 5: The Philistine Plague of Emerods

Dec 30th, 2009 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Early Christians used the fish as a symbol of Christianity because Jesus called disciples to be “fishers of men” and preached in the area of the Sea of Galilee (Matt. 4:19). In fact, fish are prominently used in the mosaic tiles of that area. In time, Papacy and the Roman Catholic Church absorbed both the name of Christianity and the symbol of the fish, which is seen in the cardinals’ pointed split “fish” hats, portraying the head of a fish. As the Catholic Church rose in power and influence and was recognized by the Roman Empire, the pagan priesthood, seeing which way the wind was blowing, very conveniently converted to supposedly become consecrated Christian priests. They brought with them a lot of their symbols, one of which was the symbol of Dagon. Cardinal Newman tried to explain the compromise and absorption of pagan customs into the Catholic Church in past centuries and how they became sanctified. An influential Protestant at one time, he converted to Roman Catholicism and wrote a book, trying to explain and justify the pagan idiosyncrasies. Incidentally, the word “nun” is an adaptation of “nin,” meaning the female aspect of a fish.

Share


1 Samuel Chapter 4: The Ark Taken, Priesthood Dead

Dec 28th, 2009 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Samuel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Eli’s neck being broken may indicate he realized his shortcoming and lack to the fullest extent. Just as the Great Company will experience the feeling of alienation from God when they go into the wilderness at the end of the age, so Eli felt alienation when the Ark, symbolizing God’s presence, was taken. The most munificent judgment we can attribute to Eli is that he pictures the Great Company. However, he was in a dangerous situation, because he was only one step removed from the sins of his sons. Hophni and Phinehas were the guilty ones, but when a person is that close to gross sin, he can incur the same guilt by too much sympathy and the failure to take a stand.

Share