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1 & 2 Timothy

2 Timothy Chapter 2: Christian Conduct

Jan 10th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Brethren in the early Church began to go out with a chip on their shoulder. In criticizing the emperor, idol worship, etc., they precipitated persecutions unnecessarily, thinking that was suffering affliction for Christ, but they were producing the suffering by foolish reasoning. Some were even put to death for castigating rulers at a public ceremony. However, that is not the type of suffering the Lord is looking for in His people. The suffering is by grace and must be received with a humble attitude at all times.

This principle is true, for the more one entangles himself with the affairs of this life, the less he can be a warrior of the gospel. Paul was not saying that those who were married should leave their spouses to preach the gospel to other nations. Rather, each Christian was to soberly consider his present status and not further entangle himself in the affairs of this life. Attention was to be focused on the Christian warfare.

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2 Timothy Chapter 1: Encouraging Words to Timothy

Jan 10th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Why did Paul use the following sequence? He was “appointed [1] a preacher, and [2] an apostle, and [3] a teacher of the Gentiles.” All of the consecrated are called to preach, but only 12 were called to be apostles (Isa. 61:1). And of the Twelve, only Paul was called to be a teacher (or apostle) to the Gentiles. The other apostles preached mainly to the Jews, with Peter having a higher commission. As a “preacher,” Paul went from home to home, visiting people in a lesser capacity, as opposed to speaking in the public forum or the synagogue. As an “apostle,” he made public pronouncements. As a “teacher of the Gentiles,” he went to Gentile lands, where he spoke publicly and made converts.

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1 Timothy Chapter 2: Prayers, Jesus the Mediator and Ransom, Women

Jan 10th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

What is usually overlooked is the theme that permeates the main body of this epistle, namely, the word “good.” In addition to the frequent use of that word, other words are employed to say the same thing. Paul was saying that doctrine has its place, but it is sound doctrine, the meat of the Word, that is important. For example, as helpful as chronology is, that subject is not the “meat” of Scripture. The principal thing is one’s consecration.

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1 Timothy Chapter 3: Elders and Deacons

Jan 10th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The requirements for a deacon are similar to those for an elder, except that the guidelines are a little less stringent. Deacons must be “grave” (serious, sober, and earnest) and “not doubletongued” (saying one thing to one person and another thing to another person). Being double-tongued is a subtle form, or the early stages, of hypocrisy. Double-mindedness is apt to go hand in hand with being double-tongued. A deacon should be stable in his conduct, thinking, speech, answers, and teaching.

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1 Timothy Chapter 4: Departures From the Faith, Practicing Holy Living

Jan 9th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Paul was saying that instead of heeding ungodly rules, giving a false show of religiosity, the Christian is to heed true godliness. One should not say, for example, that celibacy or a particular diet produces godliness. Many falsely equate such rules with godliness, whereas the Lord desires true godliness, not just outward forms. For example, to not marry does not mean one is a better Christian. However, if celibacy is sincerely done for the Lord—if one refrains from marriage in order to wholly devote himself to doing God’s will and to be fully dedicated to Christ’s work—it is spiritually beneficial. The point is that a child of God has the liberty to marry or not to marry, to eat meat or not to eat meat. Following outward formalities very sanctimoniously is a form of godliness but is not true godliness unless it is done in sincerity, without hypocrisy, and out of a pure heart.

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1 Timothy Chapter 5: How to Treat Elders, Advice for Widows

Jan 9th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Verse 18 is not referring to weekly salaries with support throughout the year. The other extreme is to reason that an elder should have no earthly compensation, since he has dedicated everything to the Lord. Paul was saying that temporal compensation of a dinner, travel expenses, or something along these lines is not out of order when given from time to time. It is not inappropriate to reward an elder who is dealing in spiritual matters with a gift or some compensation along an earthly line, but permanent, regular support, such as is given in paid ministries, is not authorized.

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1 Timothy Chapter 6: Proper Christian Conduct

Jan 9th, 2010 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Of course verse 6 is profitable when isolated and considered separately, but the context in which the statement was made is interesting, namely, the withdrawal from a situation that is perverse and not conducive to spirituality. There are times when we have to show disapproval, and to do so correctly—that is, to know what God likes and what He frowns on—we have to be familiar with His Word. To be able to discern between good and evil is a mark of maturity (Heb. 5:14). The bottom line of success is to make our calling and election sure. Few find the narrow way, and even fewer end up as part of the Bride class.

Verse 6 applies to the servant-master relationship, as well as to other situations, for one is to be content in his circumstance as long as it does not violate conscience. Stated another way, one who is engaged in menial or lowly service should be content with his circumstance because he can serve the Lord equally well whether he is a servant or a master. To realize this contentment keeps one from a fretful spirit in an employment situation or other circumstance of life. “Great gain” is being relieved of anxieties along these lines, for the cares of this life can be a snare.

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1 Timothy Chapter 1: Understanding Sound Doctrine, Disfellowship

Dec 12th, 2009 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

In addition to the long list of sins in verses 9 and 10 for which the Law was made, Paul added, “And if there be any other thing that is contrary to sound doctrine.” Many other sins are contrary to the teachings of Jesus and the apostles, who used the Old Testament extensively. The consecrated should become thoroughly familiar with the New Testament and its sound doctrine, and in doing so, they should see the need to study the Old Testament—in other words, God’s Word in its entirety.

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2 Timothy Chapter 3: Last Days Perilous Times, How to Overcome

Nov 19th, 2009 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

To go into the Greek with each word is not necessary, for the English translation is comparable in about 90 percent of the terminology. With more than a dozen characteristics, the English touches on almost every avenue, in one form or another, of what not to do. “This know also, that in the last days perilous times [dangerous times, a severe testing period] shall come.” The Epistle to Jude indicates that a very bad condition would develop in the true Church at the end of the Gospel Age. The question with regard to Paul’s letter to Timothy would be, Have the “perilous times,” prophesied to come “in the last days,” already begun to occur, or are they future? We would say these conditions have begun, even though they are stated in the extreme, for they will increase in intensity. The expression “last days” (plural) indicates these conditions would have to take place at the end of the age in the Harvest period, and we have seen many developments in the last decade or two that are peculiar to our generation. Some of these characteristics have been a trial throughout the Gospel Age, but others are different in some respects. The accounts in 2 Peter 2 and Jude carry the situation forward to a climactic conclusion, telling what will happen in the true Church. The conditions described here in verses 1-5 will lead up to that final experience, and generally speaking, what makes us think they are connected with the Harvest period is the fact that verse 8 names Jannes and Jambres, who withstood Moses.

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2 Timothy Chapter 4: The Epiphania, Preach the Word, Crown of Righteousness

Nov 19th, 2009 | By | Category: 1 & 2 Timothy, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Paul knew that he would not have an instantaneous resurrection. Henceforth a “crown of righteousness” was laid up for him, to be given “at that day [in the future]” and “unto all them also that love his [Jesus’] appearing.” Those who are truly and honestly looking forward to the appearing of the Lord in connection with his Kingdom, those who are true in conscience and spirit, will probably be especially those of the Little Flock class.

John used the same reasoning in 1 John 3:3, “And every man that hath this hope in him purifieth himself, even as he is pure.” Those who really look forward to seeing Jesus will purify themselves. Paul described this attitude, the hope of seeing Jesus, as those who “love his appearing.”

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