Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): No such file or directory in /homepages/1/d92973051/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/simple-forum/library/sf-primitives.php on line 690

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): A link to the server could not be established in /homepages/1/d92973051/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/simple-forum/library/sf-primitives.php on line 690

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): No such file or directory in /homepages/1/d92973051/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/simple-forum/library/sf-primitives.php on line 690

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): A link to the server could not be established in /homepages/1/d92973051/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/simple-forum/library/sf-primitives.php on line 690

Ephesians

Review of Epistle to the Ephesians

Dec 10th, 2009 | By | Category: Ephesians, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Paul told the Ephesians to walk in love as God’s dear children. Again he warned against fornication, uncleanness, and covetousness. He said, “You are light in the Lord, so walk as children of light.” Ephesus was known as the “light of the world,” but that light was Diana. People came to her for happiness, instruction, and a good time, but the Christian was to have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness and, instead, was to reprove them. The Christian was not just to take a negative, quiet stance but was to actively reprove at times.

Share


Ephesians Chapter 1: The Mystery of God

Dec 10th, 2009 | By | Category: Ephesians, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Paul was in prison under house arrest in Rome when he wrote this epistle, the date being about AD 64. This first imprisonment lasted for two years. Since he was executed in AD 66-68 under Nero, following his second imprisonment, the epistle was written near the close of his ministry, a ministry that lasted about 33 years. Evidently, he had inherited a lot of money and was a Roman citizen. While under house arrest, he had visitors and was able to witness, even converting some of Nero’s household.

Share


Ephesians Chapter 2: Words of Encouragement

Dec 9th, 2009 | By | Category: Ephesians, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The “middle wall of partition,” the barrier between Jew and Gentile, was figuratively eliminated through Christ. God’s exclusive dealing with Israel ended in AD 36. From then on, there has been no more barrier, for all are one in Christ. Stated another way, the spiritual “middle wall of partition” was broken down in AD 36, when Cornelius, the first Gentile convert, was begotten by the Holy Spirit.

From one standpoint, Gentile Christians were proselytes to the new religion of Christ, which had originated among the Jews. In the Ephesian class were Jews according to the flesh who had accepted Christ. However, there was a “barrier” tendency—the attitude that something was different between a Gentile Christian and a Jewish Christian. The sensitivity to this imagined difference had to be eliminated. The faith structure of both had to be based on Scripture. Paul spoke strongly with statements such as “The wall is broken down” and “There is no male or female, Jew or Greek … in the body of Christ” (Gal. 3:28 paraphrase). Paul could speak boldly because he was sure he was right from a scriptural standpoint.

Share


Ephesians Chapter 3: Jews and Gentiles Fellowheirs in Christ, Love of Christ

Dec 7th, 2009 | By | Category: Ephesians, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The “revelation” occurred when the risen Lord appeared to Paul on the way to Damascus, effecting his conversion. Paul said that God had instructed him to take the gospel to the Gentiles. He was trying to make the Ephesian Gentiles feel that they had just as great a legacy on the truth as the Jewish Christians from the Holy Land itself.

There was disunity in this class and even clamoring and tumult, so Paul’s reasoning with regard to the Gentiles being “fellowheirs” was needed. A lot was behind Paul’s choice of the word “fellowheirs” because of the disunity and undercurrent in the class.

Paul told the brethren not to faint because of his afflictions. He was not troubled by his persecutions, and neither should they be troubled. His attitude was, “It is my privilege and glory to suffer. I am happy to suffer in order to transmit this information to others.

Paul desired that Christ might dwell in their hearts by faith, and that they would be rooted and grounded in love and not have continual contention, disruption, and disunity. He was saying, “There is a motive in the calling; namely, God wants you to be established in the truth.”

Share


Ephesians Chapter 4: Walking Worthy, God gives us Helps

Dec 6th, 2009 | By | Category: Ephesians, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Paul went to a more personal exhortation with regard to problems in the class and besought the brethren to “walk worthy of the vocation” wherein they were called. This exhortation was necessary because their former life was immoral. There was cheating in business, for example.
With Ephesus being a noted commercial and “religious” center, people came from all over the Roman Empire and wanted relics or souvenirs attesting that they had been to the Temple of Diana. The making of relics provided numerous job opportunities for the Ephesians, and many lived on profits from tourism because of the Temple of Diana. Greed and covetousness, as well as the practices of the temple worship, were sinful. Temple priestesses called “virgins” were actually a form of prostitution but without an evil connotation in the heathen worship.
One phrase in the epistle became the seed thought of Gnosticism, which, among other things, said the Christian does not have to worry too much about the natural life, for immorality is not that important. They maintained that the new creature is what counts. After Paul died, Gnostics took his writings on the distinction between the spirit within us and the fleshly vessel to justify their wrong thoughts. They excused the flesh by saying that the new creature was not responsible for it, for God views us according to the spirit.

Share


Ephesians Chapter 5: Walking as Children of the Light, Relationships

Dec 6th, 2009 | By | Category: Ephesians, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Paul told the Ephesians to walk in love as God’s dear children. Again he warned against fornication, uncleanness, and covetousness. He said, “You are light in the Lord, so walk as children of light.” Ephesus was known as the “light of the world,” but that light was Diana. People came to her for happiness, instruction, and a good time, but the Christian was to have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness and, instead, was to reprove them. The Christian was not just to take a negative, quiet stance but was to actively reprove at times.
Paul admonished the Ephesians to awake from sleep, and in worldly associations, they were not to become drunk with wine. Christians are to be circumspect and shun former practices.
Instead of wine, they are to be filled with the Spirit of God, that is, with instructions from the Scriptures. In both private and public life, the Christian is to be submissive, reasonable, and pliable—where principle is not involved.

Share


Ephesians Chapter 6: Lessons of Obedience, The Whole Armour of God

Dec 6th, 2009 | By | Category: Ephesians, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The personal instruction continued. Paul closed out the epistle with the admonition to put on the full armor, the whole armor, of God. This theme is in both Colossians and Ephesians, showing that, just as with us, when letters are written by one individual to others, certain thoughts and phrases are repeated because they are contemporaneous with our thoughts and feelings of the moment. Thus there are similarities between Paul’s letter to the Colossians and his letter to the Ephesians—the language, the thinking, etc.

The considerable detail of putting on the armor reflected that Paul was a prisoner stationed near the Praetorian guard in Rome. Daily he could see the guard marching with their armor paraphernalia, and thus he drew the analogy of how, spiritually speaking, the Christian soldier should also be armored and protected from the enemy. We need all this armor to stand against unseen powers, as well as the wiles of Satan himself.

Among the armor, Paul inserted the admonition to have the “feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace.” Often when one prepares for battle, he assumes the language of the battle, but while the Christian is a soldier, he is to be careful that the combativeness is not unnecessarily used; that is, he should not look for a fight. He is not to be contentious and then try to justify his actions by saying he is standing for the truth. The weaponry of the Spirit, not carnal weapons, is used in fighting the good fight of faith. While the armor application is beautiful for the Christian, it should be used, as far as possible, in peace.

Share