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Ezekiel

Ezekiel Chapter 6: God Destroys the False Worship

Mar 3rd, 2010 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Chapter 5 told of the experiences of the people inside the city of Jerusalem. Now Ezekiel was telling of the coming utter destruction of the high places of false worship outside the city and throughout Judah. A thorough housecleaning of the nation was coming. All cities, not just Jerusalem, would be laid waste. At the end of the age, in our day, there will be a similar judgment and destruction of everything outward to do with false religion. Prominent religious edifices, both Catholic and Protestant, will be looted and despoiled. Mystic Babylon will fall with violence.

In review, the time setting is about 612 BC, that is, shortly before the desolation of 606 BC. From captivity in Babylon, Ezekiel was told to prophesy about the coming destruction. When God said, “Son of man, set thy face toward the mountains of Israel, and prophesy against them,” Ezekiel literally turned and pointed his face toward Israel and Jerusalem and then foretold the coming doom. Since he had been providentially struck with dumbness, the Lord now loosened his tongue so that the people could hear these important utterances.

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Ezekiel Chapter 7: The Horrors of the Coming Siege by Babylon

Mar 3rd, 2010 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

An end was to come upon the homeland. The repetition suggested a complete end, a final judgment. The term “four corners of the land” meant the judgment would embrace the whole land. This message, which was given about 612 BC, approximately six years before the destruction by Nebuchadnezzar, would have been uttered with expression. “Israel” was really Judah at this time, and the coming judgment included the “[whole] land” in the sense of the 70 years of desolation because of the failure of the people over the years to properly observe the Jubilees. The “four corners of the land” are a reminder of the four winds in Revelation 7:1. There is a relationship between the impending doom of natural Israel back there and the impending doom of nominal spiritual Israel in the near future. The words “an end, the end” indicate final judgment.

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Ezekiel Chapter 5: Ezekiel Acts out the Diaspora of Judah

Mar 3rd, 2010 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The setting of this chapter was right after the fulfillment of the 430 (390 + 40) days that Ezekiel lay on his left and right sides. During all that time, his hair grew. Now, at the end of the 430 days, Ezekiel was instructed to cut off all the hair on his head and beard—that was a lot of hair!—and divide it into three parts by carefully weighing it. Ezekiel’s treatment of the hair demonstrated how those of Judah would die in the coming literal siege of Jerusalem, for the hairs represented the people. There was a sufficient quantity of hair to make this demonstration dramatic. Ezekiel ended up bald.

One third of the hair was burned with fire in the midst of Ezekiel’s portrayal of Jerusalem. This action showed that the city would be destroyed by fire and that people would die in the fire. Another third of the hair was chopped with a knife, portraying that people would be slain in the violence of the war. The final third was scattered in the wind. As the hair was scattering, Ezekiel ran after the hair with a sword and slashed at it in the air, showing that people would be pursued and killed as they tried to escape from Jerusalem, ran out for food, or ran out to actively defend the city.

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Ezekiel Chapter 2: God preparing Ezekiel for his mission

Nov 18th, 2009 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

God was telling Ezekiel in advance, “Though I give you this message, it will not be accepted. In fact, the populace as a whole will reject it, but preach the message nevertheless, and do not be afraid of their looks.” Because of his strong denunciations, Ezekiel was called “the Moses of the captivity.” Christians who utter uncompromising proclamations of truth also have the experience of dwelling among briars, thorns, and scorpions, as it were. The feet members will have a parallel experience at the end of the age.

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Ezekiel Chapter 3: Ezekiel’s Commission

Nov 18th, 2009 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Ezekiel’s face and forehead were made strong and harder than flint against the Israelites’ faces so that he would “fear them not, neither be dismayed at their looks.” This suggests that the Israelites’ faces and foreheads were also hard (they were upset, angry, and displeased), but God made Ezekiel’s face and forehead even harder—like adamantine stone (such as the diamond) and thus harder than flint. He would be stern and unyielding in matters of principle, and in the message he had to discharge, he would not be cowed or affected in the least by the reaction of the people.

Flint is inflexible. Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel had strong messages. In fact, all of the prophets had strong messages. Consider Ezra, for example. He must have been a forceful character to make the Israelites separate permanently, with no communication, from their heathen wives and children.

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Ezekiel Chapter 37 Valley of Dry Bones, Sticks:Beauty and Bands

Sep 2nd, 2009 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Chapter 37 is known as the Vision of the Valley of Dry Bones. In verses 1 and 2 God took an interesting approach with Ezekiel. The prophet was shown the valley, but that was not enough. He had to travel all the way around the valley and really observe and be impressed with the fact that it was FULL of bones and the bones were VERY DRY.

Probably Ezekiel was transported to this valley by means of a vision or a trance. His seizure by the Holy Spirit, a private experience not shared by the people, did not necessarily occur at night—it could have happened during the day. At any rate, Ezekiel felt this experience. What do the “dry bones” suggest? Not only was there no life, but the bones had had no life for a long time. They were like the bones in Egypt dating from the Persian Empire under Cambyses II at the Amenehat Pyramid, that is, thousands of years old and very dry.

Ezekiel had to pass around the valley in order to have the scene impressed upon him. He saw “very many [dry bones] in the open valley [a broad expanse of valley, not just a gorge].” The implication is that the bones were scattered throughout the valley, and this disposition is significant for the antitype.

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Ezekiel Chapter 13 False Prophets

Aug 14th, 2009 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The false prophetesses made “the heart of the righteous sad” and strengthened “the hands of the wicked, that he should not return from his wicked way.” Beware lest we should fall into that category! Watch, for those telling “lies” do not realize their condition. In their eyes they are right, yet they see black as white and vice versa. Proverbs 14:12 bears repeating: “There is a way which seemeth right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death.” When a person’s conscience is sensitive, when he is learning truth and trying to develop principles, he is aware of wrong. But some people stifle their tender conscience; they “quench” the Spirit. Every time they suppress a twinge of conscience, they harden that conscience. Those who do this repeatedly over a period of time correspondingly lose the discernment of right and wrong. Ezekiel 12:2 says they “have eyes to see, and see not; they have ears to hear, and hear not; for they are a rebellious house.” We must keep the conscience tender. It needs to be regulated and instructed by Scripture.

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Ezekiel Chapter 21 Promise of Messiah

Jul 7th, 2009 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Psalm 83 and Gog & Magog, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The point is that three overturnings had to be fulfilled before Jesus could assume the rulership at his Second Advent. At that time God would “give it [the Kingdom to] him [Jesus].” Jesus secured the right to rule at his First Advent, but the exercising of this right pertains to the Second Advent—to sometime after the end of Gentiles Times, hence 1914 or thereafter. The long period of void from AD 135 “until he come whose right it is” is likened to Gentile Times. It is also likened to the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus, in which the rich man wanted a little water to cool his tongue, and to the Parable of the Pounds, in which Jesus said a nobleman went away “into a far country [heaven] to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return” (Luke 16:19–31; 19:12–27).

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Ezekiel Chapter 28, Prophecy against, Satan and his Masterpiece

Jul 7th, 2009 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Psalm 83 and Gog & Magog, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Ezekiel 28 is showing that the spirit of Papacy is the spirit of Satan himself; his spirit is reflected in his system. Satan and Papacy have the same ambitions. The prince of Tyrus sits “in the midst of the seas.” Revelation 17:1 states that the “great whore” sits on “many waters.” In both instances, the “waters” refer to peoples.

In the Book of Ezekiel, Papacy is represented as the city of Tyre and the prince of Tyre. In the Book of Revelation, Papacy is addressed as a woman, a beast, and the city of Babylon.

Note the distinction between “king” and “prince” (verse 2). The “king” of Tyrus is Satan, whereas the “prince” of Tyrus is Papacy, Satan’s masterpiece.

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Ezekiel Chapter 27 Destruction of Tyre

Jul 7th, 2009 | By | Category: Ezekiel, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Like Chapter 26, this chapter is a prophecy of the destruction of the city of Tyre (or that power or government) because of past actions, particularly their attitude toward Israel in the 606 BC captivity. Ezekiel 27:1–25 is a word picture of the tremendous wealth of both Tyre and the papal system.

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