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Jonah

Jonah Chapter 4: Jonah is angry, God’s Mercy

Oct 28th, 2009 | By | Category: Jonah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

“But it [God’s not carrying out the judgment] displeased Jonah exceedingly.” One reason Jonah fled to Tarshish was that he felt God would repent and spare Nineveh, and to not destroy the city would make him appear foolish. Also, Jonah did not want God to deal with Israel’s enemies. One lesson for us as we consider Jonah’s actions is that we should question our own motives, not God’s.

Being schooled under the Law as a favored nation that was to be kept separate and distinct from other peoples, many Jews had difficulty seeing God’s mercy. That prejudice was hard for them to overcome, and they needed a lot of convincing in one fashion or another. Those Jews who could accept the change were flexible enough to realize that God has this prerogative. The Apostle Paul gave a sermon on this subject, showing that it is God’s prerogative to have mercy on whom He will have mercy (Rom. 9:15).

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Jonah Chapter 3: Nineveh Repents

Oct 28th, 2009 | By | Category: Jonah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

When we consider Jonah from the standpoint of representing The Christ, Head and body, the three days represent the fifth, sixth, and seventh “days” from Jesus’ baptism at Jordan to the completion of the Church. In the type, the Ninevites became converted, but in the antitype, the destruction of the nominal system will precede the conversion of the people. The ministry of the Church will be successful eventually, in due time. Nineveh pictures Christendom, to whom the feet members, the Elijah class, the John the Baptist class, will give a smiting message of reproof.

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Jonah Chapter 2: Type of Christ,

Oct 28th, 2009 | By | Category: Jonah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Jonah had been fleeing from Joppa, Israel, to Tarshish, Spain. The boat was in transit, and we do not know how far he got before the whale swallowed him. Perhaps the whale was making the return trip. Let us say, then, that the parts of three days and three nights were the time (and distance) that Jonah had fled from Israel. In other words, the whale reversed direction from the route the boat was following, and it took that long for Jonah to be vomited out on dry land back where he had started.

Incidentally, while Jonah was alive in the whale’s belly for parts of three days and nights and Jesus was dead for that length of time, there is no problem in trying to tie in their experiences, for emotions and certain experiences should not be technically analyzed. Jesus had the feeling of sheol and absence from God before he died. Jonah’s praying in the whale’s belly is comparable to Jesus’ praying on the Cross, while waves of sheol were encompassing him and he feared perpetual darkness.

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The Book of Jonah Chapter 1: Commission from the Lord, Running from the Lord

Oct 27th, 2009 | By | Category: Jonah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Chronologically, Jonah followed right after Obadiah’s prophecy, which was against Edom and showed God’s judgment against Gentile power. Jonah’s prophecy also came right after Obadiah’s prophecy in regard to its lesson. The Book of Jonah represents (1) some of Jesus’ experiences and (2) the thoughts of many Jews. The latter, whom God favored for so long, tended to overdraw the lesson of judgment and to feel self-righteous. The Jews did not want to think too kindly about the other powers, and they were nervous when they heard that God would help the Gentiles. Combined with Obadiah, the Book of Jonah is a balance of mercy against judgment. Incidentally, the nominal Church and even some of the true Church likewise need lessons on God’s mercy toward those not in covenant relationship with Him.

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