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Matthew

Matthew Chapter 17: Mount of Transfiguration, Casting out Demons, Paying Taxes

Mar 19th, 2010 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

“A bright cloud overshadowed them.” This phenomenon was awesome in itself, but then a voice thundered out very majestically, “This is my beloved Son, … hear ye him.” This scene was so impressive that Peter referred to it in his epistle but said that despite its awesomeness and positiveness, the “more sure word of prophecy” was superior (2 Pet. 1:16-19). Do we have such a conviction? Is God’s Word more “sure” to us than if we had witnessed the transfiguration and heard the voice coming from the cloud? We should have the same reverence and respect for the Word of God that Peter had—regardless of the degree of our comprehension.

Being familiar with the account of the bright cloud over the nation of Israel and the Tabernacle in the Wilderness of Sinai, the disciples would have had no difficulty realizing that the message, or voice, came from God. Also, “Hear ye him [Jesus]” was almost like a reprimand, for earlier Peter had been arguing with the Master (Matt. 16:22). Now the Father was saying, “This is my Son. I am well pleased with him. You had better listen to him.” In other words, in listening to Christ, we are really listening to God, for the Son is the true and highest representative of the Father.

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Matthew Chapter 23: Deeds of the Pharisees

Jan 19th, 2010 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Again and again the emphasis of Jesus’ condemnation of the scribes and Pharisees was on money and greed. The Temple was God’s house, which Jesus purged when he overturned the tables of the money changers. The Temple and the institution of the priesthood represented the religion of Jehovah, but all kinds of sinful practices were introduced such as changing money from Roman “unholy” coins to Jewish money and selling animals in the Temple precincts. Jesus had such a high respect for the Temple that he was indignant over the traffic taking place within. Here he was making the point that it was more important to swear by the Temple, which represented God, than to swear by money or mammon. The emphasis the Pharisees gave was to the contrary, completely backwards. They devoured widows’ houses and greedily acquired money, respect, authority, lands, etc. The Temple, built according to God’s institution, was greater.

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Matthew Chapter 20: Parable of the Penny, John and James to Sit on the Right and Left

Dec 31st, 2009 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Many of us have false concepts of justice and grace, thinking something is ours by right. Suppose we were seriously unemployed, needing a job for our very survival and for that of our family. We would be thankful for any job and for getting a full day’s wage. We should start to reason from this standpoint, for otherwise, the view is distorted and disproportionate. It was grace that gave the laborers the opportunity to work in the vineyard and to receive payment. Had the laborers fully appreciated that point, the reward of the penny to all would not have been a sore point. The whole way through, the parable teaches grace, not merit.

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Matthew Chapter 19: Divorce, Rich Young Ruler

Dec 31st, 2009 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The ruler had asked what he must do to inherit eternal life, and Jesus had said, “If thou wilt be perfect.” Only perfect obedience under the Law would give life, let alone consecration and following Jesus in the Gospel Age. The rich, young ruler went away sorrowfully, “for he had great possessions” (verse 22). The discussion terminated at that point, for a sensitive area had been touched.

Not many noble, wise, mighty, or rich are called (1 Cor. 1:26). The ruler’s neighbors probably considered him exemplary, but God does the calling. Usually He purposely calls those who are not so well esteemed in order to put to foolishness the wisdom of men. God can make something out of nothing, and He can make something into nothing. He calls the humble to put to nothingness that which men admire profoundly. As a result, no flesh will be able to glory in its own presence. Paul’s reasoning is like a sequel to this incident with the rich ruler. Those who know they are “sick” need a physician; those who feel whole are less likely to seek help.

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Matthew Chapter 18: Trespasses Against Us, Stumbling One Another, Wicked Servant

Dec 31st, 2009 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

First, the one or two witnesses listen to the alleged victim to hear what the grievance is. If it is a trivial matter, the witnesses would nip the matter in the bud, and it would be dropped. But if the accusation is judged worthy of attention if it be true, then the witnesses go to hear the alleged perpetrator’s side of the story. If the witnesses find the accusation is true—that the victim has been injured and has stated the case fairly (not exaggerating it)—they would try to help the perpetrator to see the error of his way. However, the witnesses do not start out with that motive, for at first, they do not know who is right. (Some claim injury when it is really a figment of their imagination.)

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Matthew Chapter 10: The 12 Apostles, Witnessing, Sufferings, Remedy for Fear

Oct 29th, 2009 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Jesus said, “Ye shall be hated of all men for my name’s sake.” In Matthew 24:9, he said, “Ye shall be hated of all nations for my name’s sake.” These two Scriptures show that waves of very severe persecution afflict Christians from time to time. If we are in prison and know that the next day we must appear before the chief magistrate to represent the cause of Christ, we may be frightened because we are not accustomed to speaking in such a formalized manner. This situation is a little different from living the Christian life from day to day. But God says, “Do not take anxious thought, for I will give you the words.” Then, when we appear before the council, the court, and the chief magistrate—all of whom are opposed to us—we can relax, trusting in the Lord. We should reflect on the coming hatred of the true Christian cause so that we will not betray one another or recant under pressure. God will help us at that time if we trust Him. The fact that Jesus devoted several verses to the subject of persecution shows that we should reflect on them and the coming condition at the end of the age.

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Consideration of the Seven Parables of Chapter 13

Sep 16th, 2009 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

“Blessed are your eyes, for they see: and your ears, for they hear. For … many prophets and righteous men have desired to see … and to hear [understand] those things [but it was not given them to know].” The disciples were given the understanding, but before Jesus explained the parable, he told them that they were in a unique position. The lesson is that before the Lord gives us advanced understanding and truth, we must act. We must have the desire and must hunger and thirst for further righteousness if we are to be filled. Holy men of old had this desire and were in the proper heart condition, but it was not yet due time for this understanding.

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Overall Observations of Chapter 13, Various Parables

Sep 16th, 2009 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The different types of ground the seed fell on represent different heart conditions. In the Parable of the Wheat and the Tares, the instruction was not to uproot the tares until the end of the age. Thus a progression was shown. The Parable of the Mustard Seed indicates that the primitive Church started with relatively few people but grew into a large nominal system (Papacy).

In other words, we are considering these parables from a different standpoint now—a dispensational standpoint. The woman who hid leaven in the three measures of meal pictures the adulteration of truth by Papacy in three primary areas: love, faith, and hope. Treasure being hid in a field pictures the Dark Ages, when it was very difficult to find the Word of God. Diligence and effort were required.

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Matthew Chapter 24, Verses:17-43

Jun 20th, 2009 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

We continue with the chapter of Matthew 24, explaining the verses which the Lord described the End of the Age (World), Time of the End. We are warned to flee (Mystic Babylon) and take none of her baggage with us. He explains the deceptions and “Lying Signs and Wonders” that Satan will use to ensnare the “Elect” if it were possible. Jesus gives us signs to watch for (One being the restoration of Israel). He describes the Tribulation, “Time of Trouble” that was never since the world began, likening it to the Time period that Noah and even Lot lived, and how God delivered the righteous. Finally we end up with the binding of Satan for the thousand years.

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Matthew 24:1-16 Sign of Thy Coming, End of the World

May 18th, 2009 | By | Category: Matthew, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Matthew 24 is called the “Lord’s Great Prophecy.” The chapter is jam packed with pertinent prophetic information for the Christian living in our day. His disciples asked him, what would be the sign of his coming [parousia–presence], and the end of the age. The answer he gives is far deeper and broader than even they could understand.

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