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Micah

Micah Chapter 1: The Great Time of Trouble

Dec 20th, 2009 | By | Category: Micah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The prophecy starts abruptly after a brief introduction. Here “earth” refers to the people, the social order, and not to the physical planet. “All” of the people in Israel in Micah’s day were being addressed primarily, although a secondary application pertains to the last days of the present evil world. Micah literally addressed the nation back there, and there is also a message for the people living today.

The message came not only from the Lord God but also from His “holy temple.” With the source being stated this way, the message was even more authentic to the people. They could each take the message personally, for it originated from God’s own personal resentment and indignation. Micah wanted the hearers to know that the message came not from him but from God and from His “holy temple.” God was threatening the people.

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Micah Chapter 2: The Wickedness of Man

Dec 20th, 2009 | By | Category: Micah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The RSV has, “But you rise against my people as an enemy; you strip the robe from the peaceful, from those who pass by trustingly with no thought of war.” Verse 8 provides further information on the misdeeds of the priestly and governing elements. Peaceful passers-by were robbed. “Ye pull off the robe with the garment” shows in figurative language that the leadership, not content with just the outer coat, stole the undergarments as well; that is, the victim was left with very little.

Within the nation of Israel, a certain element were so greedy for wealth and/or power that they were willing to take advantage of their fellow man. Men were deprived of inheritances, their houses were robbed, etc. Micah was severely condemning the whole arrangement and likening the greedy element to an enemy. Violence was emphasized in verse 2 and again here.

Here again Micah used a play on words. More than any other prophet, he used sarcasm, paronomasias, and innuendos. He capitalized on common, everyday expressions about other cities, people, and things, giving them a new slant or pun so that they boomeranged back on the Israelites. Because these expressions are no longer used today, we understand only a fraction of what Micah was saying, but his words were mighty powerful back there. It is profitable to study the Book of Micah, for we learn certain principles that help us to evaluate other pictures and prophecies.

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Micah Chapter 3: Sin of Natural and Antitypical Israel that Bring Judgment

Dec 20th, 2009 | By | Category: Micah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Verse 8 provides a little insight into the character of Micah. Not only did he dutifully repeat what the Lord had told him to say about the sins of the people and the coming trouble, but he said, “What I am telling you is the gospel truth! You may not believe it now, but the time will come when you will have to believe it. I am speaking by the power of the Lord’s spirit!” Not satisfied to just declare the message, Micah wanted to get somebody to listen to him. He pleaded with the people that he was telling the truth. Micah’s personality becomes apparent in this earnest pleading. He was not speaking as a robot but actually felt his message and the power of its truth. He was declaring “unto Jacob his transgression, and to Israel his sin.” He told the whole nation to their face—and with great courage too!

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Micah Chapter 4: Thy Kingdom Come, God’s Promise to the Holy Remnant

Dec 20th, 2009 | By | Category: Micah, Psalm 83 and Gog & Magog, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Why did Micah introduce this prophecy about the “last [latter] days” at this point? After all his thundering predictions of trouble and destruction, he wanted to encourage the people. The Hebrew gives the thought of the “mountain of the house of the LORD” being firmly established. This figurative language about the house of God being established in the top of the mountains and above the hills means that Jerusalem will become the capital of the world—the most prominent city in the entire world, exalted above all other governments. No doubt, too, it will literally be higher than the surrounding hills after the earthquake mentioned by the Prophet Zechariah takes place (Zech. 14:4,5,10). All “people shall flow unto it” shows figuratively that there will be voluntary cooperation; the people will be drawn and not driven there.

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Micah Chapter 5: Jacob’s Trouble and Holy Remnant

Dec 20th, 2009 | By | Category: Micah, Psalm 83 and Gog & Magog, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Verse 7 is speaking about those of the Holy Remnant who survive Jacob’s Trouble in lands other than Israel. They will be like “dew from the LORD” and “showers upon the grass” in the midst of many peoples. Why is the time element then added: “that tarrieth not for man, nor waiteth for the sons of men”? In the Lord’s due time, the Holy Remnant will be rescued. The “whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain … [waiting] for the manifestation of the sons of God”; it has been a long wait—and a long groaning—for the “desire of all nations” to come (Rom. 8:19,22; Hag. 2:7).

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Micah Chapter 6: God’s Controversy with His People

Dec 19th, 2009 | By | Category: Micah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Some incorrectly conclude from verses 6-8 that God was not interested in sacrifices and that, therefore, there should not have been any. However, God ordained the sacrifices Himself, so they had to be proper. The point is that the sacrifices taught lessons; they had a typical value. The main lesson was that without the shedding of blood, there could be no remission of sin; that is, death was connected with the forgiveness of sins. Indeed the sacrifices should have pointed the nation of Israel to Messiah.

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Micah Chapter 7: The Great Time of Trouble

Dec 19th, 2009 | By | Category: Micah, Psalm 83 and Gog & Magog, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Imagine even the very best of them being like a “brier,” that is, sharp and dangerous! “The day of thy watchmen and thy visitation [punishment—RSV]” was the day of judgment. The prophets were the “watchmen” of the day of trouble. This thought is based on the fact that fortified cities in the past had walls upon which watchmen took turns day and night to look for approaching trouble, enemies, etc. That way the city could always be warned of impending trouble. Similarly, the Lord had some prophets arise late and early to watch over His people, Israel. Warnings were continually given of a coming day of judgment if the people did not repent and change their evil ways. Here Micah said that the day of judgment had come, that the experience was upon them.

In the antitype, Christendom will be in this situation, especially after the Harvest when “summer is ended” and the “salt of the earth” has been taken away (Jer. 8:20; Matt. 5:13). For the most part, no righteous man will remain (except the Great Company, who will not have a stabilizing effect on society).

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