Posts Tagged ‘ Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus ’

Isaiah Chapter 65: Sins of Israel, The Kingdom Come

Jan 10th, 2012 | By | Category: Isaiah, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Although these are valuable lessons for the Christian, when verse 24 is considered in context, it shows that there will be prayer in the Kingdom Age. Jesus said, “It is written, My house shall be called the house of prayer” (Matt. 21:13). Truly the Third Temple will be a “house of prayer for all people” (Isa. 56:7). While the Kingdom will be an age of sight and works, as opposed to the age of faith now, prayer will always be in order.

Share


Hosea Chapter 3: Hosea Redeems Gomer

Mar 11th, 2010 | By | Category: Hosea, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

When Hosea purchased Gomer back, she had to be separated, for according to the ritual in the Law, she was unclean. Hosea was not “husband” to her, and neither was anybody else. In other words, in antitype, even though God purchased back Israel through the death of Jesus, He did not immediately show His love and affection for the nation in a “husbandly” way. He took Israel back, as it were, and put the nation in quarantine for many days—that is, for the Gospel Age and the period of the “double.” A great gulf has existed, as shown in the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus. The Diaspora is also pictured in Ezekiel’s vision of the valley of dry bones (Ezek. 37:1,2). Israel was in a dry and forlorn condition until rather recently.

Share


John Chapter 11: Raising of Lazarus, Priesthood Conspires

Dec 22nd, 2009 | By | Category: John, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Apparently, Jesus decided to return to Judea when Lazarus died. Thus Jesus’ initial delay, which John observed, was very significant. The other disciples were probably preoccupied with other matters, and hence they missed this observation. Jesus’ delay was the same principle as “Let the dead bury their dead” (Matt. 8:22). Our minds should be on the more important matters. There are two ways of viewing Jesus’ statement in verses 9 and 10, namely, from his standpoint and from the apostles’ standpoint. All of them had responsibilities, and there are practical lessons either way. Jesus was saying that he would not waste his time by traveling during the daylight hours. He used the daytime to minister to others as he made his way to Judea. And the disciples should have realized the importance of, and capitalized on, his preaching—on all the fragments of opportunity.

Share


John Chapter 12: Spikenard Mary, Jealousy of the Scribes and Pharisees

Dec 22nd, 2009 | By | Category: John, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Judas’s remark, “Why wasn’t this ointment sold for 300 pence and given to the poor?” sounded very noble, but it was not his real reason. His argument seemed to be sensible, for 300 pence could have helped a lot of poor people, but we must watch lest we do similarly in our reasoning. Jesus cannot be equated with the poor. Jesus said, “The poor are with you always,” but he would not be there with them always (Matt. 26:11 paraphrase). Hence Judas made a false appraisal. He was the treasurer—he held “the bag” (John 12:6)—but he was a thief as well and hence was really looking for ways to benefit himself. Nevertheless, his reasoning sounded very plausible.

Sometimes Christians also use false reasoning. For example, some are very magnanimous with the property and possessions of other people. They are only too willing to sacrifice the property of others, not the property of self. They will control the lives of others, write their wills, etc.

Share