Posts Tagged ‘ Sarah Covenant ’

Genesis Chapter 35: Benjamin Born, Rachel Dies and is Buried, Isaac Dies and is Buried in the Tomb of the Patriarchs (Cave of Machpelah)

Mar 9th, 2010 | By | Category: Genesis, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

At last, Jacob arrived at Mamre in Hebron where Isaac was. Thus Jacob met Isaac while his father was still alive. Isaac died at age 180. Esau and Jacob were together for the burial of their father. Since the cave of Machpelah was right there in Hebron, it was convenient to bury Isaac there with Abraham, Sarah, and Rebekah (Gen. 23:17-20; 25:8,9; 49:30-33). Abraham died at 175, Isaac died at 180, Jacob died at 147, and Joseph died at 110 (Gen. 25:7; 35:28; 47:28; 50:26).

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Isaiah Chapter 49: Messianic Prophecies, the Holy Remnant is Saved

Mar 2nd, 2010 | By | Category: Isaiah, Psalm 83 and Gog & Magog, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Isaiah 49 is primarily a prophecy of Jesus and his schooling and preparation for the future work God has set before him. In a secondary sense, it can be considered a prophecy of the body members, for in their association with Jesus, they will participate in his work and be a light to the Gentiles. In a third sense, the prophecy has a bearing on natural Israel. Jesus, the Church,and natural Israel all have some similar experiences. Down through history, it has been a paradox that the true Christian and fleshly Israel have suffered.

These verses reveal that the mysterious personage will be a “light to the Gentiles” and that he will restore Jacob and Israel. Therefore, the mysterious personage of verses 1-6 cannot be natural Israel, for Israel will not restore itself. God appoints this “Israel” as “his servant.” The “servant,” or mysterious personage, is Jesus, the “messenger of the [New] covenant” (Mal. 3:1).

The theme of Jacob’s Trouble is repeated over and over in Scripture. We often say that restitution is spoken of by the mouth of all God’s holy prophets (Acts 3:21), but Jacob’s Trouble is spoken of by nearly all of God’s holy prophets. And just like restitution, the theme is veiled with “here a little, and there a little” (Isa. 28:10).

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Genesis Chapter 27: Isaac Gives Jacob the Blessing, Jacob Flees from Esau

Feb 26th, 2010 | By | Category: Genesis, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Yes. Deceptions subsequently happened to Jacob to reverse what he had done to Isaac, but nevertheless, the Abrahamic promise was not disannuled or vitiated. Sometimes a higher law takes precedent over a lower law. The more important higher law supersedes the lower law, but the lower law still stays in operation. For example, a kid of the goats was killed and its blood put on Joseph’s coat of many colors to deceive Jacob into thinking Joseph was dead (Gen. 37:31-33). Retribution had to come, but for Jacob, it was well worth his securing the blessing. Justice was satisfied when retribution operated on Jacob—even though Esau, in his earlier life, did not consider the spiritual blessing that important and sold it for some pottage.

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Genesis Chapter 24: Finding a Wife for Isaac, Eliezer Meets Rebekah at the Well, Isaac and Rebekah Wed.

Feb 17th, 2010 | By | Category: Genesis, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Eliezer prayed that God would speedily show kindness to Abraham. (The answer came so fast that he almost could not believe it!) He prayed that when he would say, “Let down your pitcher so I may drink,” he would recognize the bride for Isaac by her reply, “Drink, and I will also bring water for your camels.” Eliezer laid down stipulations: the fleece, as it were. What an extraordinary test—that the woman would water all ten camels! He was looking for a bride with the proper attitude, one who was willing to go beyond what was required and render more out of love. Not only did Eliezer want a miracle, but also he wanted it right away and at this particular well. He did not desire to tarry in his mission.

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Genesis Chapter 21: Isaac is Born, Hagar and Ishmael Sent Away, Well of the Oath

Feb 2nd, 2010 | By | Category: Genesis, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Weaned Christians, who use meat rather than milk, “have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil” (Heb. 5:14). Christians have needed the basic principles in every stage of the gospel Church, and the weaning of the Isaac class pertaining to character development has been taking place throughout the Gospel Age. Weaning is a separation (1) from milk to meat and (2) from carnality to spirituality. Spirituality is the opposite of carnality.

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Song of Solomon Chapter 6: The Bride’s Love for Christ and His Love for Them

Jan 12th, 2010 | By | Category: Song of Solomon, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The Church are collectively considered to be “one.” “She is the only one of her mother, she is the choice one of her that bare her.” The “mother … that bare her” is the Sarah Covenant, the “Jerusalem … above, … which is the mother of us all” (Gal. 4:26).

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Why is Naomi represented as the Church in the Book of Ruth?

Dec 5th, 2009 | By | Category: Questions You Ask (click for the full answer)

The name Elimelech means “God is King.” His wife’s name, Naomi, signifies “pleasantness,” “pleasant one.” Mahlon and Chilion were their two sons. Mahlon means “sickly,” “one having an infirmity,” and the thought of Chilion is “pining” or “wasting.” Both of the sons’ names suggest a process of illness, a sickly condition. In antitype they represent the Jewish people, the ten-tribe and the two-tribe kingdoms, who rejected Jesus. Jesus said, “Behold, your house is left unto you desolate” (Matt. 23:38).

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The Book of Ruth Chapter1: Naomi, Ruth, and Orpah in Moab

Nov 9th, 2009 | By | Category: Ruth, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The name Elimelech means “God is King.” His wife’s name, Naomi, signifies “pleasantness,” “pleasant one.” Mahlon and Chilion were their two sons. Mahlon means “sickly,” “one having an infirmity,” and the thought of Chilion is “pining” or “wasting.” Both of the sons’ names suggest a process of illness, a sickly condition. In antitype they represent the Jewish people, the ten-tribe and the two-tribe kingdoms, who rejected Jesus. Jesus said, “Behold, your house is left unto you desolate” (Matt. 23:38).

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Ruth Chapter 2: Naomi sends Ruth to Boaz’s field

Nov 9th, 2009 | By | Category: Ruth, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

Ruth ended up in “a part of the field” that belonged to Boaz. At first glance, her being there seemed to be by chance, but she was providentially guided. The “field” was actually a valley or a plain, so the thought is that Ruth went to Boaz’s portion of the plain.

The Law required that corners of the field not be reaped in order to leave them for the poor. Therefore, the poor were at liberty to enter the corners and glean there. However, Ruth “gleaned … after the reapers”; that is, she gathered the “crumbs,” the residue, after the reapers had gone through. Whatever fell to the ground when the grain was bound in bundles was also to be left for the poor.

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Ruth Chapter 3: Ruth Uncovers Boaz’s Feet

Nov 9th, 2009 | By | Category: Ruth, Verse by Verse --Studies led by Br. Frank Shallieu (Click on Book name)

The Book of Ruth is a beautiful story of the Gospel Age from the standpoint of principle and the things that endear the Ruth class to Boaz (Jesus), but when Ruth and Naomi came back to Israel, it was the time of harvest. Hence, at that point, the picture shifts down to the end of the Gospel Age. Ruth 2:23 says that Ruth gleaned through both the barley and the wheat harvests. In gathering the wheat, she threshed only for her private use. Regarding the end of the age, the collective standpoint is also significant. Ruth gleaned to the end of the barley and wheat harvests and dwelled with her mother-in-law.

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